About Us

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The UTL CATALOGUE includes:

The Music Library printed collections, over 300,000 books, scores, periodicals and microforms.

The Sniderman Recordings Collection, 180,000 sound recordings, from cylinders to blu-ray.

The Olnick Rare Book Room, 2,500 volumes exemplifying the history of music and of music editing, performance and printing -- from liturgical manuscripts and early printed treatises, to first editions of Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and Gershwin, and early Canadian sheet music and tune books. A significant number of 18th- and 19th-century opera full scores, with particular strength in the French repertoire, complements the large libretto holdings of the Central Library.

Online audio, video, scores, and electronic journals and other research resources.

 

Music Library Special Collections:

Archival Collections Documents the creative activity of composers and performers associated with the University and the city. The collections include manuscripts, correspondence, programs, photographs and recordings of artists such as John Beckwith, Talivaldis Kenins, Udo Kasemets, the Hart House String Quartet and Kathleen Parlow.

Sheet Music and Choral Octavo includes about 50,000 items: songs, piano pieces and method books in sheet music format, mostly issued 1800-1950, plus a browsing collection of choral octavo stored in binders by category: mixed voices, unison voices, women's voices, men's voices, Christmas music, and folk music.

The Performance Collection supports the programs of the Faculty's major ensembles, with choral music in multiple copies, and sets of parts for jazz ensembles , band, and orchestra. There are currently about 3500 titles: new material is purchased or rented when required for performances.

LP / vinyl discs catalogued since 1995. Records catalogued before that are represented in the card catalogue.

Faculty Events Streaming audio is available for listening within the Music Library, for concerts and other events from 2001 to the present. The collection is still under development for earlier events.